Moose River

British Columbia. River: Fraser River drainage
Flows SE into Fraser River, E of Moose Lake
52°55’00” N 118°48’00” W — Map 83D/15 — GoogleGeoHack
Earliest known reference to this name is 1871 (Trutch).
Name officially adopted in 1923
Official in BCCanada
Driving ties on Moose River. This river-valley contains about twenty square miles of unalienated timber.

Driving ties on Moose River. This river-valley contains about twenty square miles of unalienated timber.
Reprt of the Minister of Lands for British Columbia for 1912

Hudson’s Bay Company governor George Simpson referred to Moose Lake in 1824, and Milton and Cheadle referred to Moose River in their account of July 1863:

Soon after we started, we came to Moose River, which was somewhat difficult to ford, for the water was high and rapid, pouring over the horses’ shoulders in the deepest part. Mr. O’B. lost nerve and steered badly, his horse lost its footing, and nearly took a voyage into the Fraser; the rider, however, gripped mane and saddle firmly, and both got ashore together, adding another hair’s-breadth escape to Mr. O’B.’s list.

This name appears on B.C. Surveyor General Joseph William Trutch’s 1871 map of British Columbia and on McEvoy’s 1900 map showing the Yellowhead Pass region.

References:

  • Simpson, George [1792–1860]. Fur trade and empire. George Simpson’s journal entitled Remarks connected with fur trade in consequence of a voyage from York Factory to Fort George and back to York Factory 1824-25. Frederick Merk, editor. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1931. University of British Columbia Library
  • Milton, William Wentworth Fitzwilliam [1839–1877], and Cheadle, Walter Butler [1835–1910]. The North-West Passage by Land. Being the narrative of an expedition from the Atlantic to the Pacific, undertaken with the view of exploring a route across the continent to British Columbia through British territory, by one of the northern passes in the Rocky Mountains. London: Cassell, Petter and Galpin, 1865, P. 263. Internet Archive
  • Trutch, Joseph William [1826–1904]. Map of British Columbia to the 56th Parallel North Latitude. Victoria, B.C.: Lands and Works Office, 1871. University of Victoria
  • McEvoy, James [1862–1935]. “Map Showing Yellowhead Pass Route From Edmonton To Tête-Jaune Cache.” (1900). Natural Resources Canada

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