Collie’s map Yellowhead Pass 1912

Part of the Rocky Mountains North of trhe Yellowhead Pass, J. Norman Collie, 1910-11

Part of the Rocky Mountains North of trhe Yellowhead Pass, J. Norman Collie, 1910-11
The Geographical Journal 1912

This map accompanies “Exploration in the Rocky Mountains North of the Yellowhead Pass” by J. Norman Collie, Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S, F.R.G.S., etc., The Geographical Journal (London), 39 (1912):223-233.

John Norman Collie [1859–1942] was a chemist and mountaineer who lived at London, England. Between 1897 and 1911, Collie pioneered climbing in the Canadian Rockies, making twenty-one first ascents including Mount Victoria and Mount Athabasca.

This Map is from a plane table survey by Professor J. Norman Collie, based upon the map of the “Yellow-head Pass Route,” by Mr. J. McEvoy, B.A.Sc., of the Canadian Government Survey, which accompanies Part D., Vol XI., of the Report of the Geological Survey of Canada, 1900. The positions of Roche Miette, Roche Jacques, Roche Suette, and the Athabasca and Stoney rivers were laid down exactly as they are on that map, and the plane table survey of the mountainous region to the north of the Yellowhead Pass and Moose Lake adjusted to them. A traverse with the plane table was first run up the Stoney river as far as its source and Mt. Hoodoo, and rays were drawn to peaks on either side of the valley which were intersected from other points later on. Numerous photographs were taken during the expedition, many of which were used in the construction of the plane table map, and provided means of testing its general accuracy.

The position of Mt. Robson as determined by Professor Collie differs only about one mile from that given by Professor A. P. Coleman.

The heights underlined are taken from McEvoy’s map, while those in brackets are rough estimations; all others are from Collie’s readings of an aneroid, which was checked frequently by comparison with a mercurial barometer. They were computed by Collie with a mean sea-level of 30 ins., and should be considered as approximate only. In all cases the heights are above sea level.

— Note by editor of The Geographical Journal (London)
References:

  • McEvoy, James [1862–1935]. Report on the geology and natural resources of the country traversed by the Yellowhead Pass route from Edmonton to Tête Jaune Cache comprising portions of Alberta and British Columbia. Ottawa: Geological Survey of Canada, 1900. Natural Resources Canada
  • Mumm, Arnold Louis [1859–1927]. “Mount Robson District. Mumm and Collie’s 1910 Journey.” Alpine Journal, Vol. 25 (1910–1911):466
  • Collie, John Norman [1859–1942]. “Exploration in the Rocky Mountains North of the Yellowhead Pass.” The Geographical Journal (London), 39 (1912):223-233. JSTOR
  • Collie, John Norman [1859–1942]. “On the Canadian Rocky Mountains north of the Yellowhead Pass.” Alpine Journal, Vol. 26 (1912):5-17
  • Collie, John Norman [1859–1942]. “Early Expeditions of the Rocky Mountains.” Alpine Journal, Vol. 33 (1920–1921):319

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *