Moose Pass

Alberta-BC boundary. Pass
Headwaters of Moose River and Calumet Creek
53°14’00” N 119°01’00” W — Map 83E/3 — GoogleGeoHack
Earliest known reference to this name is 1911 (Walcott).
Name officially adopted in 1956. Official in BCCanada
View of Moose Pass and Tah Peak: our camp was in the forest on the right. Photo by R. C. W. Lett, by courtesy of Grand Trunk Pacific Railway

View of Moose Pass and Tah Peak: our camp was in the forest on the right. Photo by R. C. W. Lett, by courtesy of Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
National Geographic Magazine 1913

“As we crossed the beautiful Moose Pass on the Coleman trail of 1908 (6,700 feet = 2,042 meters), I noted that the pass was on the line of a fault that had displaced and tilted up a great block of limestones and shales,” Charles Doolittle Walcott wrote of the 1912 Smithsonian expedition to Mount Robson.

Arthur Philomen Coleman made unsuccessful attempts on Mount Robson in 1907 and 1908.

“Moose Pass station” appears on Arthur Oliver Wheeler’s 1912 topographical map of the Mount Robson region.

References:

  • Coleman, Arthur Philemon [1852-1939]. The Canadian Rockies: new and old trails. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1911. Internet Archive
  • Wheeler, Arthur Oliver [1860-1945 ]. “The Alpine Club of Canada’s expedition to Jasper Park, Yellowhead Pass and Mount Robson region, 1911.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 4 (1912):9. Alpine Club of Canada
  • Wheeler, Arthur Oliver [1860-1945]. “Topographical Map Showing Mount Robson and Mountains of the Continental Divide North of Yellowhead Pass to accompany the Report of the Alpine Club of Canada’s Expedition 1911. From Photographic Surveys by Arthur O. Wheeler; A.C.C. Director.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 4 (1912):8-81. Victoria Library, University of Toronto
  • Walcott, Charles Doolittle [1850–1927]. “The monarch of the Canadian Rockies.” National Geographic Magazine, (1913):626. Internet Archive
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