Author Archives: Swany

George Simpson

George Simpson [1792–1860]

b. 1792
d. 1860

Sources of biographical information about Simpson:

Events in the Mount Robson region in which Simpson was involved:

  • 1824 Simpson recrossing Athabasca Pass
  • 1824 Simpson and Ross cross Athabasca Pass from west
  • 1826 Simpson orders use of YHP
Works pertinent to the Mount Robson region of which Simpson was author or co-author:

  • —   Fur trade and empire. George Simpson’s journal entitled Remarks connected with fur trade in consequence of a voyage from York Factory to Fort George and back to York Factory 1824-25. Frederick Merk, editor. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1931. University of British Columbia Library
  • —   Peace River: A Canoe Voyage from Hudson’s Bay to Pacific, by the Late Sir George Simpson (Governor, Hon. Hudson’s Bay Company.) In 1828: Journal of the Late Chief Factor, Archibald McDonald (Hon. Hudson’s Bay Company), Who Accompanied Him; Edited, with Notes by Malcolm McLeod, Barrister, etc.. Ottawa: J. Durie & Son., 1872

Hugh Drummond Allan

Hugh Drummond Allan [1887–1917]

b. 1887 — Partick, Lanarkshire, Scotland
d. 1917 — Croiselles, France

Hugh Drummond Allan was born in Scotland and came to Canada around 1907. He became a British Columbia Land Surveyor in 1912. His professional work was carried on mainly in the Kamloops district and the North Thompson River valley. In 1913 he surveyed in the Canoe River area. “From Mile 49 on the Grand Trunk Pacific I proceeded with my party by wagon and reached the Canoe River in one day,” he reported.

After the start of the first World War he returned to Scotland and enlisted in Princess Louise’s (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders). In 1916 he was wounded, and in 1917 he was killed leading his company at Croiselles, France. Lieutenant (or Captain) Allan was shortly predeceased by his wife and infant child.

The British Columbia Archives has the following items related to Hugh Drummond Allan (none available online as of 2022):

Photograph, ca. 1890
Photograph of Captain Hugh Drummond Allan, ca. 1914
Probate record from Kamloops Supreme Court, 1918

The National Archives of the U.K. has officer service records pertaining to Lieutenant Hugh Drummond Allan of Princess Louise’s (Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders).

There is another Canadian figure of Scottish birth named Hugh Allan [1810–1882], a shipping magnate.

Sources of biographical information about Allan:

  • Corporation of Land Surveyors of the Province of British Columbia. Annual Reports (1956).
  • Andrews, Gerald Smedley [1903–2005]. Métis outpost. Memoirs of the first schoolmaster at the Métis settlement of Kelly Lake, B.C. 1923-1925. Victoria: G.S. Andrews, 1985
Allan is the namesake of the following places in the Mount Robson region:

Works pertinent to the Mount Robson region of which Allan was author or co-author:

  • —   “Canoe River Valley.” Report of the Minister of Lands, (1914)

A. L. Withers

A. L. (Pete) Withers

Sources of biographical information about Withers:

  • Bennett, Russell H. “The Ski Ascent of Snow Dome.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol 20 (1931):100-101
  • Scott, Chic. “Jasper to Banff on skis.” Mountain Heritage Magazine, Vol. 2, No. 1 (1999) Whyte Museum
Withers is the namesake of the following places in the Mount Robson region:

Events in the Mount Robson region in which Withers was involved:

  • 1924 Chamberlin party Cariboos

Rollin Thomas Chamberlin

Rollin Thomas Chamberlin [1881–1948]

b. 1881 — Beloit, Wisconsin, USA
d. 1948

Rollin Thomas Chamberlin, 1881-1948, was a geologist and mountaineer at Chicago, Illinois. Chamberlin was an eminent Professor of Geology at the University of Chicago who, in 1910, made numerous guided climbs in the Rocky and Selkirk Mountains, including the Lake Louise, Lake O’Hara, Field and Glacier areas. In 1924, Chamberlin, Allen Carpe and A. L. Withers made a number of first ascents in the Cariboo Mountains, including Mount Titan (now Mount Sir Wilfred Laurier) and Mount Challenger.

Sources of biographical information about Chamberlin:

  • Pettijohn, F. J. “Rollin Thomas Chamberlin: a Biographical Memoir.” (1970) National Academy of Sciences
  • Chamberlin, Rollin Thomas [1881–1948]. Rollin T. Chamberlin fonds V22. 1910–1927 Whyte Museum
Chamberlin is the namesake of the following places in the Mount Robson region:

Events in the Mount Robson region in which Chamberlin was involved:

  • 1924 Chamberlin party Cariboos
Works pertinent to the Mount Robson region of which Chamberlin was author or co-author:

  • —   Rollin T. Chamberlin fonds. V22 (1910–1927).
  • —   Rollin T. Chamberlin fonds V22. 1910–1927
  • —   “Exploration of the Cariboo Mountains of British Columbia.” Bulletin of the Geographical Society of Philadelphia, 25 (1925):59-76

Allen Carpé

Allen Carpé [1894–1932]

b. 1894 — Chicago,
d. 1932

Sources of biographical information about Carpé:

  • Annual Report of the Director of the National Park Service to the Secretary of the Interior for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1932, and the Travel Season, 1932. Washington: United States Government Printing Office, 1932 Google Books
  • Wikipedia. Alen Carpé
Carpé is the namesake of the following places in the Mount Robson region:

Events in the Mount Robson region in which Carpé was involved:

  • 1924 Chamberlin party Cariboos
Works pertinent to the Mount Robson region of which Carpé was author or co-author:

  • —   “Climbs in Cariboo Mts. and Northern Gold Range, Interior Ranges of British Columbia.” Alpine Journal, Vol. 37 (1925):63
  • —   “Albreda Mountain.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 16 (1927–1927):177
  • —   “The Cariboo Mountains – Correction.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 16 (1927–1927):177

Wapumun Lake

British Columbia. Lake
Just S of Kakwa Lake
53.9942 N 120.1706 W — Map 093H16 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1925
Official in BCCanada

Adopted 1 December 1925 on 93H/16 as labelled on BC-Alberta Boundary sheets 38 & 39. In lieu of original paperwork this name was reconfirmed 16 July 1963. May have previously been labeled as Wapumoon Lake.

A descriptive name given by Samuel Prescott Fay [1884–1971] in 1914, spelled by him “Wapumoon.”

“Wapumun” is recorded as being a Cree word interpreted as “mirror” or “reflection.”

References: