Category Archives: Place Names

Edand Creek

Creek. British Columbia: Flows NE into Fraser River immediately above Doré River
53°20’00” N 120°11’00” W — Map 93H/8 — GoogleGeoHack
Earliest known reference to this name is 1985.
Name officially adopted in 1985. Official in BCCanada

Adopted 1987 on 93H/8, as submitted in September 1985 by Water Management Branch, Prince George — name used on water licences (earliest date not cited). Origin/significance not explained.

References:

  • British Columbia Geographical Names. Government of BC. Edand Creek. BCGN

Arthur Wheeler’s 1912 topographical map of the Mount Robson region

References:

  • Wheeler, Arthur Oliver [1860-1945]. “Topographical Map Showing Mount Robson and Mountains of the Continental Divide North of Yellowhead Pass to accompany the Report of the Alpine Club of Canada’s Expedition 1911. From Photographic Surveys by Arthur O. Wheeler; A.C.C. Director.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 4 (1912):8-81. Victoria Library, University of Toronto
  • Wheeler, Arthur Oliver [1860-1945 ]. “The mountains of the Yellowhead Pass.” Alpine Journal, Vol. 26, No.198 (1912):382

Bowman 1895 Map

Map of the Cariboo Mining District to illustrate the report of Amos Bowman

Map of the Cariboo Mining District to illustrate the report of Amos Bowman
Cariboo Gold Rush

References:

  • Bowman, Amos [1839–1894]. Map of the Cariboo Mining District, British Columbia, to illustrate the report of Amos Bowman. 1895. Cariboo Gold Rush
  • Bowman, Amos [1839–1894]. Maps of the principal auriferous creeks in the Cariboo mining district, British Columbia. Ottawa: Geological Survey of Canada, 1895. Hathi Trust

James McEvoy’s 1900 map showing Yellowhead Pass route from Edmonton to Tête-Jaune Cache

Map Showing Yellowhead Pass Route From Edmonton To Tête-Jaune Cache. James McEvoy, 1900.

Map Showing Yellowhead Pass Route From Edmonton To Tête-Jaune Cache. James McEvoy, 1900.
Natural Resources Canada


Map Showing Yellowhead Pass Route From Edmonton To Tête-Jaune Cache. James McEvoy, 1900. Detail of Yellowhead Pass to Tête Jaune Cache

Map Showing Yellowhead Pass Route From Edmonton To Tête-Jaune Cache. James McEvoy, 1900. Detail of Yellowhead Pass to Tête Jaune Cache
Natural Resources Canada

James McEvoy’s 1900 map showing the Yellowhead Pass route from Edmonton to Tête-Jaune Cache.

James McEvoy

References:

  • McEvoy, James [1862–1935]. “Map Showing Yellowhead Pass Route From Edmonton To Tête-Jaune Cache.” (1900). Natural Resources Canada
  • McEvoy, James [1862–1935]. Report on the geology and natural resources of the country traversed by the Yellowhead Pass route from Edmonton to Tête Jaune Cache comprising portions of Alberta and British Columbia. Ottawa: Geological Survey of Canada, 1900. Natural Resources Canada

Coleman’s 1911 map of Mount Robson

Mt. Robson Region map by A. P. Coleman, 1911

Mt. Robson Region map by A. P. Coleman, 1911
The Canadian Rockies : new and old trails, p. 264

References:

  • Coleman, Arthur Philemon [1852-1939]. The Canadian Rockies: new and old trails. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1911. Internet Archive

Joseph Trutch’s 1871 map of British Columbia

Trutch, Joseph William. Map of British Columbia to the 56th Parallel North Latitude, 1871

Trutch, Joseph William. Map of British Columbia to the 56th Parallel North Latitude, 1871
University of Victoria


Trutch, Joseph William. Map of British Columbia to the 56th Parallel North Latitude, 1871 (detail)

Trutch, Joseph William. Map of British Columbia to the 56th Parallel North Latitude, 1871 (detail)
University of Victoria

Sir Joseph William Trutch, KCMG (18 January 1826 – 4 March 1904) was an English-born Canadian engineer, surveyor and politician who served as first Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia.

Following an apprenticeship to civil engineer Sir John Rennie, he travelled to California after hearing news of the California Gold Rush of 1849. He arrived in British Columbia in 1859, following the Fraser River gold rush of 1858. He found employment by working various government contracts as a surveyor, and in 1862 was contracted to construct a portion of the Cariboo Road between Chapmans Bar and Boston Bar along the canyon of the Fraser River. Tolls collected from a suspension bridge along the road, along with prudent land acquisitions, made Trutch a wealthy man.

References:

  • Trutch, Joseph William [1826–1904]. Map of British Columbia to the 56th Parallel North Latitude. Victoria, B.C.: Lands and Works Office, 1871. University of Victoria
  • Joseph Trutch. Wikipedia