Category Archives: Place Names

Mount Terry Fox Park

British Columbia. Provincial Park
Adjacent to NW side of Mount Robson Provincial Park
52°57’00” N 119°15’00” W — Map 83D/14 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1982. Official in BCCanada

Mount Terry Fox Park established by Order in Council 1211, 23 June 1982, containing 1930 hectares more or less

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Abrams Creek

British Columbia. Creek: Fraser River drainage
Flows N into Holmes River
53°20’21″N N 119°43’39” W — Map 83E/5 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 2010. Official in BCCanada

Name required for a water licence application. Abrams Creek chosen to recall Ted Abrams, a Tête Jaune trapper from the years just before WW I who participated in the McBride trappers’ exchange for many years.
References and photo of Abrams in The Robson Valley Story by Marilyn Wheeler; Sternwheeler Press, McBride, 2008; pp 18, 228, 252, 360.

References:

  • British Columbia Geographical Names. Government of BC. Abrams Creek. BCGN
  • Wheeler, Marilyn. The Robson Valley Story. McBride, B.C.: Sternwheeler Press, 2008

Centennial Creek

British Columbia. Creek: Fraser River drainage
Flows E into Slim Creek, NE of Pinkerton Lake
53°40’32” N 121°29’49” W — Map 93H/11 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1974. Official in BCCanada

Adopted 1974 as submitted in November 1970 by A.C. Van Der Post, BC Forest Service. Named in BC’s Centennial Year, 1971.

References:

  • British Columbia Geographical Names. Government of BC. Centennial Creek. BCGN

Flat Heart River

British Columbia. : Columbia River drainage
David Thompson’s name for Wood River
Earliest known reference to this name is 1811 (Thompson).

Our residence was near the junction of two Rivers from the Mountains with the Columbia: the upper Stream which forms the defile by which we came to the Columbia, I named the Flat Heart, from the Men being dispirited ; it had nothing particular. The other was the Canoe River ; which ran through a bold rude valley, of a steady descent, which gave to this River a very rapid descent without any falls…

Thompson’s “Flat Heart ” river is now Wood river. It is clear from this text that both the Athabaska Pass and the Canoe river region had been visited earlier than this by the guide, Thomas the Iroquois, and by other Nipissing and Iroquois Indians ; but Thompson was the first white man to cross it.

References:

  • Thompson, David [1770–1857]. David Thompson’s Narrative of His Explorations in Western America, 1784-1812. Toronto: Champlain Society, 1916. p. 451. University of British Columbia
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