Robson Glacier

Alberta-BC boundary. Glacier: Fraser River drainage
E of Berg Lake, NE of Mount Robson
53°08’00” N 119°06’00” W — Map 83E/3 — GoogleGeoHack
Earliest known reference to this name is 1910 (Coleman).
Name officially adopted in 1956
Official in BCCanada
Robson Glacier six miles in iength. The watershed between Alberta and British Columbia lies up its centre. Photo: George Kinney, 1908

Robson Glacier six miles in iength. The watershed between Alberta and British Columbia lies up its centre. Photo: George Kinney, 1908
Canadian Alpine Journal 1909


Shows forefoot of Robson Glacier sending its waters northward to Lake Adolphus and southward to Berg Lake. The Great Divide lies between. Photo: Rev G.B. Kinney, 1908

Shows forefoot of Robson Glacier sending its waters northward to Lake Adolphus and southward to Berg Lake. The Great Divide lies between. Photo: Rev G.B. Kinney, 1908
Canadian Alpine Journal 1910


Working up through the vast and broken front of Hunga Glacier. Photo: R. C. W. Lett, 1911

Working up through the vast and broken front of Hunga Glacier. Photo: R. C. W. Lett, 1911
National Geographic Magazine 1913


Billings Butte - Robson Peak - Iyatunga Mountain. Panonamic view of the Robson massif and adjoining mountains, with the great Hunga glacier in the foreground. 
Photo: Charles D. Walcott, 1912

Billings Butte – Robson Peak – Iyatunga Mountain. Panonamic view of the Robson massif and adjoining mountains, with the great Hunga glacier in the foreground.
Photo: Charles D. Walcott, 1912
National Geographic Magazine 1913


The Robson Glacier and Pass showing streams flowing east and west. 
Photo: P.L. Tait, 1913

The Robson Glacier and Pass showing streams flowing east and west.
Photo: P.L. Tait, 1913
Canadian Alpine Journal 1915

“Between Rearguard and Titkana Peak, leading from the wonderful snow-filled cirque, seen in its entirety from our station on the Lynx Range, flows the Robson Glacier,” wrote Arthur Oliver Wheeler in 1912. “It describes a circular sweep around Rearguard, and, though much crevassed in its upper reaches, it generally easy to travel over.”

References:

  • Kinney, George Rex Boyer [1872-1961]. “Mount Robson.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 2 (1909):10-16. Alpine Club of Canada
  • Coleman, Arthur Philomen [1860-1945]. “Geology and glacial features of Mt. Robson.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 2, No. 2 (1910):73-78. Alpine Club of Canada
  • Coleman, Arthur Philemon [1852-1939]. The Canadian Rockies: new and old trails. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1911. Internet Archive
  • Wheeler, Arthur Oliver [1860-1945 ]. “The Alpine Club of Canada’s expedition to Jasper Park, Yellowhead Pass and Mount Robson region, 1911.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 4 (1912):9-80. Alpine Club of Canada
  • Walcott, Charles Doolittle [1850–1927]. “The monarch of the Canadian Rockies.” National Geographic Magazine, (1913):626. Internet Archive
  • Wheeler, Arthur Oliver [1860-1945]. “Robson Glacier.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 6 (1914–1915):104-107. Alpine Club of Canada
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