Category Archives: Place Names

Sunbeam Creek Ecological Reserve

British Columbia. Ecological Reserve: Fraser River drainage
Sunbeam Creek
53°19’59” N 120°11’12” W — Map 093H08 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1965
Official in Canada

Ecological Reserves preserve representative and special natural ecosystems, plant and animal species, features and phenomena.

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Also see:

Upper Raush Protected Area

British Columbia. Protected Area
Upper Raish River
52°57’44” N 119°59’35” W — Map 083D13 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 2018
Official in Canada

While the Upper Raush (5,582 ha) and Lower Raush (1,279 ha) are two distinctly separate protected areas, their adjacency and similarity warrant their being documented as one unit.

Created through the efforts of the Robson Valley Land and Resource Management Plan and the Protected Areas Strategy, these protected areas protect portions of an undeveloped, relatively pristine watershed. Located on the southwest side of the Fraser River, just south of McBride, these protected areas have no road access or facilities of any kind. As part of the Northern Columbia Mountains Ecosection, these protected areas contain four biogeoclimatic subzones. Dominating the valley floor is Sub-boreal Spruce (SBSdh) while slightly upslope a rare variant of Interior Cedar Hemlock (ICHmm) exists. Higher yet, one finds Engelmann Spruce-Subalpine Fir (ESSFmm1) melding into Alpine Tundra (AT).

There is no road access to either of these protected areas. There is an old road on the east side of the Raush River, on private land, and permission from the owner must be obtained. The Lower Raush protects excellent riparian wildlife habitat, while the Upper Raush protects a variety of biogeoclimatic subzones.

References:

Rearguard Falls Park

The Rearguard Falls viewpoint provides an excellent opportunity for travelers to witness the end of a long journey by the Chinook, largest of the Pacific salmon. These fish have survived several years at sea to return to the river of their birth, the mighty Fraser. From its estuary in British Columbia’s lower mainland to this point, the Chinook have traveled upstream over 1200 km. Some may be successful battling over these falls to reach the gravel above, but for most, Rearguard Falls marks the end of their journey.

References:

Terry Fox Creek

British Columbia. Creek: Fraser River drainage
Flows W. into Fraser River
52°58’33” N 119°19’6″ W — Map 083D14 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1981
Official in BCCanada

Adopted 15 September 1981; BC Parks requires a name for this watercourse, for a boundary description.

References:

Mount Robson Protected Area

British Columbia. Protected Area
Area adjacent to W Mount Robson Park
53°0’40” N 119°17’29” W — Map 083E03 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 2018
Official in BCCanada

Mount Robson Protected Area established by Order in Council 955, 30 September 2004: the whole containing approximately 14 hectares.

Marathon Creek

British Columbia. Creek: Fraser River drainage
Flows N. into Fraser River near Mount Robson
53°0’23” N 119°16’46” W — Map 083E03 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1981
Official in BCCanada

Related to Terry Fox and his “Marathon of Hope”. The headwaters of this creek are in Mount Terry Fox Park.

James Teit 1909 map of Shuswap Territory

Map showing the Shuswap Territory. Figure 199, p. 450, Teit

Map showing the Shuswap Territory. Figure 199, p. 450, Teit

Fig. 199. Map showing the Shuswap Territory.

A – Fraser River Division
B – Cañon Division, territory now largely occupied by the Chilcotin
C – Lake Division
D – North Thompson Division

D’ – Kinbasket
D” – Former territory of the Iroquois Band
D”’ – Shuswap, Cree, and Iroquois mixed
E – Bonaparte Division

F – Kamloops Division.
G – Shuswap Lake Division.
G’ – Arrow Lake Band.
• – Villages.
+ – Former villages

Dotted area, territory recently occupied by the Chilcotin.
Area at head of Fraser River, enclosed by broken double lines, temporarily occupied by the Sekanai.

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James Alexander Teit (1864 —1922) was an anthropologist, photographer and guide who worked with Franz Boas to study Interior Salish First Nations peoples in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Accompanying Boaz, he was a member of the Jesup North Pacific Expedition, a major anthropological expedition to Siberia, Alaska, and the northwest coast of Canada. The purpose of the expedition was to investigate the relationships among the peoples at each side of the Bering Strait.

References:

  • Teit, James Alexander [1864–1922]. The Jesup North Pacific Expedition. Memoir of the American Museum of Natural History. Volume 2, Part 7. The Shuswap. New York: Stechert, 1909. American Museum of Natural History