Category Archives: Place Names

Jasper National Park of Canada

Alberta. National Park
52°59’0″ N 118°6’0″ W — Map 083D16 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 2001
Official in Canada

Extending over 11,000 square kilometres, Jasper National Park is the largest national park in the Canadian Rockies and part of UNESCO’s Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks World Heritage Site.

References:

Grand Trunk Pacific Railway map central British Columbia ca. 1918

Central section of British Columbia shewing the county served by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, 1911

Central section of British Columbia shewing the county served by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, 1911
University of Toronto Library


Central section of British Columbia shewing the county served by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, 1911 (detail)

Central section of British Columbia shewing the county served by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, 1911 (detail)
University of Toronto Library

[1007]
“Map of the Central Section of British Columbia Shewing the Country Served by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. 2,000,000 ACRES AGRICULTURAL LAND”

Promotional map showing land available for agriculture, hunting and fishing, fruit, and gold along the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway line, printed in red over a base map is copyright 1911 by Poole Bros., Chicago. The railway overlay was added after 1916, when the station at Knole was renamed Rider, but before 1920, when the Grand Trunk Pacific was absorbed into the Canadian National Railway, joining the Canadian Northern Railway.

These stations are in the area covered by this website:

Pre-emptor’s map 1916 Fort George

Depicting lands open for pre-emption. Department of Lands, British Columbia,1916

Depicting lands open for pre-emption. Department of Lands, British Columbia,1916
Northern British Columbia Archives Item 2008.2.1.02

Colour-coded map depicting lands from Fort George to Urling open for pre-emption, lands in “University Reserve,” and lands reserved for public auction. Depicts land recording divisions, communities, bodies of water, transport routes, and game reserves.

Department of Lands, British Columbia. G. Herbert Dawson, Surveyor-General.

Pre-emptor’s map 1923 Tête Jaune Sheet

Map depicting surveyed lands, statutory timber lands, land recording divisions, game reserves, communities, bodies of water, and transport routes. Department of Lands, British Columbia

Map depicting surveyed lands, statutory timber lands, land recording divisions, game reserves, communities, bodies of water, and transport routes. Department of Lands, British Columbia
Northern British Columbia Archives

Colour-coded map depicting surveyed lands respectively open and closed to preemption. Depicts land recording divisions, game reserves, communities, bodies of water, and transport routes. Includes inset of McBride townsite.

Created by Department of Lands, British Columbia. F.C. Green, Surveyor-General.

Pre-emptor’s map 1931 Tête Jaune Sheet

Depicting surveyed lands respectively open and closed to preemption. Department of Lands, British Columbia, 1931

Depicting surveyed lands respectively open and closed to preemption. Department of Lands, British Columbia, 1931
Northern British Columbia Archives

Colour-coded map depicting surveyed lands respectively open and closed to preemption. Depicts land recording divisions, game reserves, communities, bodies of water, and transport routes. Includes inset of McBride townsite.

Created by Department of Lands, British Columbia. F.C. Green, Surveyor-General.

This map includes:
McIntosh Creek
Also see:

Fitzhugh

Alberta.
Former name of Jasper
Earliest known reference to this name is 1912
Not currently an official name.
18 miles east of the Yellowhead Pass on the Canadian National Railway
Messrs. E.H. Fitzhugh, Alfred W. Smithers, W.D. Robb, Charles M. Hays, H. Deer, A.B. Atwater and W.E. Davis, 1910

Messrs. E.H. Fitzhugh, Alfred W. Smithers, W.D. Robb, Charles M. Hays, H. Deer, A.B. Atwater and W.E. Davis, 1910
Charles Melville Hays Collection / Library and Archives Canada


Fitzhugh before the arrival of the railroad, ca. 1911

Fitzhugh before the arrival of the railroad, ca. 1911
Alberta on Record

Near the end of 1910 the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway established a divisional point at mile 112 (as measured from the McLeod River), near a plateau between the Miette and Athabasca Rivers. It was called Fitzhugh after the vice-president and general manager of the railway, Earl Hopkins Fitzhugh Jr. [1853–1930].

By 1911 the Canadian government had decided to make Fitzhugh the administration center for Jasper National Park. The town survey completed in 1913 was approved one year later. Development of the town began in earnest during the summer of 1913. The first change was to rename the town Jasper, the name by which it is known today.


The spring of 1912 [Donald Phillips] built his corrals and a shack in Fitzhugh (which was changed to Jasper the fall of 1913) right in the middle of what is known as Pyramid Drive now.

The trail from Fitzhugh to Maligne Lake is a good one, built by the Otto Bros, last spring. Ten miles out from Fitzhugh is Buffalo Prairie, which is on a low bench along the Athabaska River and through which several streams flow which head on the mountain

— Wilkins

Early in September, 1911, we swam our horses across the Athabaska River below Fitzhugh in the Jasper Park, on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.

The trail from Fitzhugh to Maligne Lake is a good one, built by the Otto Bros, last spring. Ten miles out from Fitzhugh is Buffalo Prairie, which is on a low bench along the Athabaska River and through which several streams flow which head on the mountain.

— Phillips

Fitzhugh, named after vice-president of the Grand Trunk Railway, is, owing to its central position at the junction of the three valleys, bound to become an important centre. There is plenty of room for it to grow and expand in the park-like situation that has been chosen.

— Wheeler

References:

  • Ermatinger, Edward [1797–1876]. Edward Ermatinger’s York Factory express journal, being a record of journeys made between Fort Vancouver and Hudson Bay in the years 1827–1828. Ottawa: Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada, 1912. Internet Archive
  • Wilkins, Bert. Jasper: Jasper Yellowhead Archives. “What Curlie told me regarding his climb of Mt. Robson” (1909).
  • Phillips, Donald [1884–1938]. “Fitzhugh to Laggan. Report by Donald Phillips to A. O. Wheeler, Director of the Alpine Club,Canada.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 4 (1912):83-86. Alpine Club of Canada
  • Wheeler, Arthur Oliver [1860–1945]. “The Alpine Club of Canada’s expedition to Jasper Park, Yellowhead Pass and Mount Robson region, 1911.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 4 (1912):9-80. Alpine Club of Canada
  • Archives Society of Alberta. Jasper Yellowhead Historical Society Fitzhugh photograph collection. 1911–1927. Alberta on Record
Also see:

Rider Tunnel

British Columbia. Railway Point
CNR, E of Goat River
53°29’00” N 120°32’00” W — Map 93H/7 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1930
Not currently an official name.

At Mile 108 west of the Yellowhead Pass, Mile 18 west of McBride in the Fraser subdivision on the Canadian National Railway.

It was necessary to construct a tunnel near Rider to facilitate traffic through the mountain. The tunnel was actually closer to Legrand than Rider even though it was called the “Rider Tunnel “The geography in that location was such that the hillside was prone to landslides which frequently covered the railway tracks. For many years a tunnel watchman was employed to monitor conditions to ensure safe rail travel. In her book, The Robson Valley Story, Marilyn Wheeler records that Ed Walsh, the orchardist from Legrand, was the “tunnel keeper” at Rider.

— Olson

References:

  • Olson, Raymond W. Ghost Towns on the East Line. Prince George, B.C.: Raymond W. Olson, 2017, p. 127
Also see: