Category Archives: Place Names

Grant 1872 Yellowhead Pass to Kamloops

Yellow Head Pass to Kamloops. George Monro Grant, plate 34

Yellow Head Pass to Kamloops. George Monro Grant, plate 34
Ocean to Ocean: Sanford Fleming’s Expedition through Canada in 1872

Our maps of the country, east of the Rocky Mountains, are mainly from Captain Palliser’s; those of the Pacific slope from Governor Trutch’s map of British Columbia. For a number of the plates illustrating the Dawson route we are indebted to Mr. Desbarats and his artists ; to the latter and to a kind lady in Ottawa, for making pictures out of our own rude but, we believe, faithful outlines.
References:

  • Grant, George Monro [1835–1902]. Ocean to Ocean: Sanford Fleming’s Expedition through Canada in 1872. Being a Diary Kept During a Journey from the Atlantic to the Pacific with the Expedition of the Engineer-in-Chief of the Canadian Pacific and Intercolonial Railways. Toronto: James Campbell and Son, 1873. Google Books

Fort George

British Columbia. Former name of Prince George: Fraser River drainage
Confluence of Nechako and Fraser Rivers
53°54’47” N 122°44’43” W — Map 093G15 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1958
Official in BCCanada

Fort George was a trading post founded in 1807 by Simon Fraser of the North West Company and named after King George III.

The Carrier Indian name for this point at the confluence of the Nechako and Fraser Rivers was “Thle-et-leh” meaning “the confluence”.

References:

Also see:

Mahood Lake

British Columbia. Lake
51°55’50” N 120°22’55” W — Map 092P16 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1955
Official in Canada

After James Adams Mahood, land surveyor, who died in 1901. Mahood conducted a CPR survey party along the shore of the lake in 1872.

By the next year James Adams Mahood, a CPR surveyor, had cut a trail past Indianpoint Lake on his way to Tete Jaune Cache, where he was to meet Selwyn’s Thompson river party, but a few months later the CPR chose a route far to the south and the trail fell into disuse.

References:

  • Wright, Richard. “Tales of a trail [Goat River].” BC Outdoors, (1985)

Ancient Forest / Chun T’oh Whudujut Provincial Park

British Columbia. Provincial Park: Fraser River drainage
Enclosing Highway 16 north of Dome Creek
53°47’59” N 121°18’26” W — Map 093H14 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 2016
Official in Canada

Ancient Forest / Chun T’oh Whudujut Provincial Park is British Columbia’s newest park and is quickly becoming one of the “must do” parks to see and hike in British Columbia.

In the traditional territory of the Lheidli T’enneh (historically known as the Fort George Indian Band), the 11,190 hectare park protects a portion of the only inland temperate rainforest in the world. Hiking the Ancient Forest trail will bring you past thousand year old western red cedars and a rich biodiversity of plants, mosses, lichens and fungi.

The 450 metre long universal access boardwalk provides the opportunity for people with all abilities to experience this majestic area. Another 2.3 km of boardwalk provides access to magnificent “Big” Tree, Tree Beard, Radies Tree and a beautiful cascading waterfall.

References:

Evanoff Park

British Columbia. Provincial Park: Fraser River drainage
Between McGregor and Torpy rivers
54°5’2″ N 121°20’17” W — Map 093I03 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 2002
Official in Canada

The park is situated in the Hart Ranges of the Canadian Rockies. This park protects one of the most remarkable caves, the nationally significant Fang Cave complex, which includes the ninth longest cave in Canada. Other caves include the Tooth Decave and Window on the West.

The 1,473 hectare park also provides a scenic, easily accessible destination for backcountry recreation. It includes picturesque alpine bowls, three small alpine lakes, and distinctive limestone pinnacles and ridges. Two separate trails, the Fang Trail and Torpy Trail, provide access to small alpine basins, with a connection over Fang Mountain. The Torpy Trail continues outside the park to Torpy Mountain.

References:

North Thompson Oxbows Manteau Park

British Columbia. : North Thompson River drainage
Not currently an official name.

A wide, meandering river system containing floodplain wetlands, numerous oxbow lakes, sandbars, back channels, levees, along the glacier-fed North Thompson River This 515 hectare park protects a wide meandering river system with a high level of diversity. This section of river is a very productive part of the North Thompson River.

References:

  • British Columbia Parks.

North Thompson Oxbows East Park

British Columbia. Provincial Park: North Thompson River drainage
North Thompson River just W of junction with Albreda River
52°28’54” N 119°14’39” W — Map 083D06 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1996
Official in BCCanada

North Thompson Oxbows East Park protects a stretch of wide meandering river system with a high level of diversity in a very productive part of the upper North Thompson River lowlands. This 293 hectare park protects small patches of old growth hybrid spruce and subalpine fir.

Established by Order in Council 590, 30 April 1996.

References:

Holliday Arch Protected Area

British Columbia. Protected Area: Fraser River drainage
N of Holliday Creek
53°13’6″ N 119°51’17” W — Map 083E04 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 2018
Official in Canada

Holliday Creek Arch Protected Area was created through the efforts of the Robson Valley Land and Resource Management Plan and the Protected Areas Strategy. This small, 395 hectare protected area showcases a magnificent natural stone arch, a very rare feature of provincial significance. In excess of 80 metres wide and 18 metres high, this arch spans a steep, rocky gully. Mountain goats frequent this area, providing visitors an opportunity to view one of the most interesting geological features in the province, and a chance to see mountain goats in their natural habitat.

For almost three decades it has been a designated Ecological Reserve, but it now enjoys status as a Class “A” provincial park. The park has no road access, but it can be reached via an 8 km hiking trail from Highway 16. This trail is extremely steep and rough and can be subject to snow, rock and debris slides. Only hikers in excellent physical condition should attempt this trail.

References:

Also see:

Holliday Arch Protected Area