Tag Archives: Railway

Von Zuben (railway point)

British Columbia. Railway Point
CNR, N of Valemount
52°51’00” N 119°16’45” W — Map 83D/14 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1989. Official in BCCanada

Named for Raphael Leonard von Zuben, a Canadian National Railways purchasing agent, who assisted the railroad with exploring the Canadian Rockies.

References:

  • CN (Canadian National Railway). Transportation planning branch, Edmonton, and historical office, Montréal.
  • Mike von Zuben (son). Personal correspondence. 2001

Urling (railway point)

British Columbia. Railway Point
On CNR, W side of upper Fraser River between Torpy and Morkill Riversr
53°41’00” N 120°52’00” W — Map 93H/10 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1983. Official in BCCanada

Possibly named after the county of Urling in Ireland.

References:

  • CN (Canadian National Railway). Transportation planning branch, Edmonton, and historical office, Montréal.

Taverna station

British Columbia. Railway Point
CNR, E of Tête Jaune
52°58’25” N 119°24’50” W — Map 83D/14 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1989. Official in BCCanada

J. Taverna was master mechanic for Canadian National Railways in Kamloops. A Taverna family resided at Lucerne around 1915.

References:

  • Yellowhead Pass and its people. Valemount, B.C.: Valemount Historic Society, 1984
  • CN (Canadian National Railway). Transportation planning branch, Edmonton, and historical office, Montréal.

Swift Creek (railway point)

British Columbia. Former railway station
CNR, head of Canoe River
Earliest known reference to this name is 1918.
Katherine Blackman, Betty Cox, Mrs. Minnard and Mrs. Couture outside Swift Creek station, 1924

Katherine Blackman, Betty Cox, Mrs. Minnard and Mrs. Couture outside Swift Creek station, 1924
Valemount & Area Museum

The Cranberry Lake post office was changed to Swift Creek in 1918. In 1927, the Canadian National Railway decided to move the Swift Creek railway station and name it Valemount, the “valley in the mountains.”

References:

  • Topping, William. A checklist of British Columbia post offices. Vancouver: published by the author, 7430 Angus Drive, 1983

Spicer (railway point)

British Columbia. Railway Point
CNR, N of Valemount
52°53’05” N 119°18’15” W — Map 83D/14 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1989. Official in BCCanada

J.H. Spicer was vice-president of the Canadian National Railway mountain region in Edmonton.

References:

  • CN (Canadian National Railway). Transportation planning branch, Edmonton, and historical office, Montréal.

Shere (railway point)

British Columbia. Locality
CNR, between Small and Spittle creeks
53°02’00” N 119°35’00” W — Map 83E/4 — GoogleGeoHack
Earliest known reference to this name is 1919.
Name officially adopted in 1983. Official in BCCanada

Shere was the construction engineer on this section of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. The name is plotted on the Provincial Pre-emptor’s map of 1919.

The Shere post office was open from 1923 to 1944 with J. A. McDougall (b. 1894) as postmaster. Less than ten examples of the cancellation mark are known in collections.

References:

  • Robson Valley Courier. Weekly newspaper published by Pyramid Press of Jasper from 1968–88 .
  • Topping, William. A checklist of British Columbia post offices. Vancouver: published by the author, 7430 Angus Drive, 1983
  • CN (Canadian National Railway). Transportation planning branch, Edmonton, and historical office, Montréal.
Also see:

Rider (railway point)

British Columbia. Railway Point
CNR, E of Goat River
53°29’00” N 120°32’00” W — Map 93H/7 — GoogleGeoHack
Name officially adopted in 1930. Official in BCCanada

Named after Sir Henry Ryder Haggard (1856-1925), a popular novelist who, in July 1916, travelled from Vancouver to Edmonton along this line when it was the old Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, which the mountain overlooks.

It is not clear why Sir Haggard’s name would have been used, nor is it clear whether the GTP station here (known as Knole until 1916, then renamed Rider) was named in association with the mountain, or vice versa. See Mount Rider.

References:

  • British Columbia Geographical Names. Government of BC. Rider. BCGN

Resplendent (railway point)

British Columbia. Railway point, former construction town
West end of Moose Lake
Earliest known reference to this name is 1911.
Topographical Map Showing Mount Robson and Mountains of the Continental Divide North of Yellowhead Pass. Detail of Moose Lake. 1912

Topographical Map Showing Mount Robson and Mountains of the Continental Divide North of Yellowhead Pass. Detail of Moose Lake. 1912
Victoria Library, University of Toronto

To be resplendent is to be shining, brilliant, splendid. The name derives from the multicolored rock outcroppings nearby. During railroad construction, the Grand Trunk Pacific had quite a town at Resplendent, or Mile 29, a little over a mile west of Red Pass.

Indicated on Arthur Wheeler’s “Topographical Map Showing Mount Robson and Mountains of the Continental Divide North of Yellowhead Pass,” 1912.

References:

  • Wheeler, Arthur Oliver [1860-1945]. “Topographical Map Showing Mount Robson and Mountains of the Continental Divide North of Yellowhead Pass to accompany the Report of the Alpine Club of Canada’s Expedition 1911. From Photographic Surveys by Arthur O. Wheeler; A.C.C. Director.” Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 4 (1912):8-81. Victoria Library, University of Toronto